Sidor som bilder
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

propriation for the support of a Library,” passed the 21st of February, 1806; and Messrs. SeyBERT, Lowndes, and QUINcy, were appointed the committee. Mr. Gold, from the committee appointed the 13th instant, presented a bill providing for the more convenient taking of affidavits and bail in civil causes depending in the courts of the United States; which was read twice, and committed to a Committee of the Whole on Monday next. On motion of Mr. Burwell, John Taliaferro, who has contested the election of John P. HunGerford, had leave to occupy a seat on the floor of the House, for the purpose of being heard, in

person, when the subject-matter of the said con

tested election shall be under"consideration."

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES.

On motion of Mr. DAwson, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole, on the bill for apportioning the Representatives among the several States, according to the third enumera

ion. The bill having been read, the question on filling the blanks occurred. The first was in relation to the number of inhabitants for each Representative ; when - Mr. DAwson observed, that he was instructed by the committee who directed him to report this bill, to propose filling the blank with the words forty thousand; but he should himself vote against filling the blank with this number, because it would deprive the State of Rhode Island of one-half of her present Representatives; it would deprive Connecticut, and Maryland each of one member, and Virginia of two. He should, therefore, be in favor of filling the blank with 37,000, as this number would not deprive any State of a Representative, and it would only increase the present number of Representatives from 142 to 180, Mr. Ridgely, from Delaware, hoped the blank would not be filled with 40,000. He was in favor of filling it with 35,000, which he thought would do more equal justice to all the States than any other number, and would leave less fractional numbers. This number would give two members to the State he represented; a greater number would leave a very large fraction. If 35,000 were agreed upon, it would give the House 181 members, which, he thought, could not be considered as an extravagant number. Mr. R. urged the o of thus filling the blank, at considerable ength. - §. Potter spoke of the hardship which the State which he represented (Rhode Island) would

experience, is the number proposed should be

agreed to. Mr. P. thought such treatment, from her sister States, would illy requite the great exertions of her citizens during the Revolution, or the commercial and manufacturing enterprise of his constituents, which was at least equal to that of any State in the Union. He hoped, in order to afford time for deliberation on this subject, that the Committee would rise, and report progress. He made this motion; which was negatived.

The question was then taken on filling the blank with 40,000, and negatived—ayes 60, noes 53. Mr. DAwson then moved to fill the blank with the words 37,000. Mr. ANDERson moved 39,000. Mr. Boyd was in favor of a smaller number. He thought the reasons offered by the gentleman from Delaware, in favor of filling the blank with 35,000, were deserving of attention, and spoke at some length in favor of this number. Questions were severally taken on filling the blank with 39,000, 38,000, and 37,000, and negatived; the last by one vote only. The question was then put upon 35,000, and carried—69 votes being in favor of it. Mr. DAwson moved that the Committee rise. The other blanks in the bill would be easily filled in the House, after the number of inhabitants to each Representative should be definitively settled. The Committee rose accordingly, and took up the report. Mr. SMIlie voted in Committee of the Whole in favor of filling the blank with 37,000, in order to accommodate those States which would suffer by having the blank filled with 40,000, though he thought that number would be best; but as he found the members from those very States voted against 37,000, and in favor of a smaller number, he should now be in favor of 40,000. After considerable debate, in which Mr. Ridgely, Mr. Fisk, and Mr. WidgeRy, spoke in favor of agreeing to the report, and Mr. J. RANDolph against it, and in favor of filling the blank with 37,000, the question on filling the blank with 35,000, was taken and negatived—yeas 48, nays 76, as follows: YEAs—Daniel Avery, Josiah Bartlett, Abijah Bigelow, Adam Boyd, Elijah Brigham, John C. Calhoun, Epaphroditus Champion, Langdon Cheves, Martin Chittenden, John Davenport, jun., Samuel Dinsmoor, Elias Earle, William Ely, James Emott, James Fisk, Asa Fitch, Thomas R. Gold, Edwin Gray, Isaiah L. Green, Bolling Hall, Obed Hall, John A. Harper, Richard Jackson, junior, Philip B. Key, Lyman Law, Robert Le Roy Livingston, James Milnor, Samuel L. Mitchill, Jonathan O. Moseley, Timothy Pitkin, jun., Benjamin Pond, Peter B. Porter, Elisha R. Potter, Josiah Quincy, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, Lewis B. Sturges, George Sullivan, Samuel Taggart, Benjamin Tallmadge, Uri Tracy, Pierre Van Cortlandt, jun., Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, and William Widgery. NAxs—Willis Alston, jun., William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, John Baker, David Bard, Burwell Bassett, William W. Bibb, Harmanus Bleecker, Thomas. Blount, James Breckenridge, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, William Butler, Matthew Clay, John Clopton, Thomas B. Cooke, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, William Findley, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Felix Grundy, Aylett Hawes, Jacob Hufty, John P. Hungerford, John M. Hyneman, Joseph Kent, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Joseph Lefever, Joseph Lewis, junior, Aaron Lyle, Nathaniel Macon, George C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Archi

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

Mr. TRoup moved to fill the said blank with the words “forty thousand,” and the question being taken, it was determined in the negative— yeas 50, nays 72, as follows: YEAs—Willis Alston, junior, William Anderson, Ezekiel Bacon, David Bard, Josiah Bartlett, William W. Bibb, Harmanus Bleecker, Thomas Blount, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, John C. Calhoun, Langdon Cheves, Matthew Clay, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, Joseph Desha, William Findley, Meshack Franklin, Felix Grundy, Bolling Hall, Obed Hall, Jacob Hufty, John M. Hyneman, William R. King, Abner Lacock, William Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, Nathaniel Macon, George C. Maxwell, Archibald McBryde, Samuel McKee, Samuel L. Mitchill, James Morgan, Thomas Newbold, Israel Pickens, William Piper, Jonathan Roberts, William Rodman, Ebenezer Sage, Adam Seybert, Samuel Shaw, John Smilie, William Strong, Peleg Tallman, George M. Troup, Charles Turner, jun., Robert Whitehill, David “R. Williams, and Thomas Wilson. o NAYs—Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, Burwell Bassett, Abijah Bigelow, Adam Boyd, James Breckenridge, Elijah Brigham, William Butler, Epaphroditus

Champion, Martin Chittenden, John Clopton, Thomas.

B. Cooke, John Davenport, jun., John Dawson, Sam

uel Dinsmoor, Elias Earle, William Ely, Jas. Emott,

James Fisk, Asa Fitch, Thomas Gholson, Thomas R. Gold, Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, Isaiah L. Green, John A. Harper, Aylett Hawes, John P. Hungerford, Richard Jackson, junior, Joseph Kent, Philip B. Key, Lyman Law, Joseph Lefever, Joseph Lewis, jr., Robert Le Roy Livingston, Thomas Moore, William McCoy, Alexander McKim, Arunah Metcalf, James Milnor, Jeremiah Morrow, Jonathan 0. Moseley, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Timothy Pitkin, jun., James . Benjamin Pond, Elisha R. Potter, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, John Rhea, John Roane, Thomas Sammons, Ebenezer Seaver, John Sevier, George Smith, John Smith, Richard Stanford, Silas Stow, Lewis B. Sturges, George Sullivan, Samuel Taggart, Benjamin Tallmadge, Uri Tracy, Pierre Wan Cortlandt, jun., Laban Wheaton, Wm. Widgery, and Richard Winn. *.

[blocks in formation]

Bard, Josiah Bartlett, Burwell Bassett, Abijah Bigelow, Harmanus Bleecker, Thomas Blount, Jas. Breckenridge, Elijah Brigham, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, William Butler, Epaphroditus Champion, Langdon Cheves, Matthew Clay, John Clopton, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, John Davenport, junior, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, William Ely, James Emott, William Findley, Asa Fitch, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Thos. R. Gold, Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, Felix Grundy, Obed Hall, Aylett Hawes, Jacob Hufty, John P. Hungerford, John M. Hyneman, Richard Jackson, jr., Joseph Kent, Philip B. Key, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Lyman Law, Joseph Lefever, Joseph Lewis, jun., Robert Le Roy Livingston, William Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, Nathaniel Macon, George C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Archibald McBryde, William McCoy, Samuel McKee, Alexander McKim, Arunah Metcalf, James Milnor, Samuel L. Mitchill, Jeremiah Morrow, Jonathan O. Moseley, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Israel Pickens, William Piper, Timothy Pitkin, junior, James Pleasants, junior, Benjamin Pond, Elisha R. Potter, John Randolph, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, William Rodman, Ebenezer Sage, Thomas Sammons, John Sevier, John Smilie, George Smith, John Smith, Richard Stanford, Silas Stow, Lewis B. Sturges, Benjamin Tallmadge, Peleg Tallman, Uri Tracy, George M. Troup, Charles Turner, jun., Pierre Van Cortlandt, junior, Laban Wheaton, obert Whitehill, David R. Williams, Wm. Widgery, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Winn. Nars—William W. Bibb, Adam Boyd, John C. Calhoun, Martin Chittenden, Samuel Dinsmoor, Jas. Fisk, Isaiah L. Green, Bolling Hall, John A. Harper, James Morgan, Josiah Quincy, Henry M. Ridgely, Ebenezer Seaver, Abam Seybert, Samuel Shaw, William Strong, George Sullivan, and Samuel Taggart. Mr. DAwson moved to fill the other blanks in the bill, as follow: New Hampshire, five members; Massachusetts, eighteen ; Vermont, five; Rhode Island, two; Connecticut, seven; New York, twenty-five; New Jersey, six; Pennsylvania, twenty-one; Delaware, one ; Maryland, nine; Virginia, twenty-two; North Carolina. thirteen; South Carolina, nine; Georgia, five; Kentucky, ten ; Ohio, six; and Tennessee, six. The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, and the House adjourned.

[ocr errors]

Monday, November 25.

The SPEAKER laid before the House the annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the state of the finances of the United States, in obedience to the “Act to establish the Treasury Department.”—Referred to the Committee of Ways and Means.

Mr. Avery, from the committee appointed on the fourteenth instant, presented a bill for the relief of John Burnham; which was read twice, and committed to a Committee of the Whole totnorrow.

On motion of Mr. Poindexter,

Resolved, That so much of the petition of the inhabitants of West Florida, as relates to the annexation of that Province to the Mississippi Territory, be referred to the committee appointed

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

The bill for the apportionment of representatives according to the third enumeration of the people of the United States was read a third time; and on the question, “Shall the bill pass?” Mr. Bibb moved to recommit the bill, with a view to substitute another ratio for that on which it is now predicated. The motion was supported at considerable length by Mr. Quincy, as also by Mr. KEY and Mr. WidgeRY and Mr. SMILIE, and opposed by Mr. RANDolph. The motion for recommitment was lost—yeas 56, nays 72, as follows: YEAs—William Anderson, Daniel Avery, Ezekiel Bacon, Josiah Bartlett, William W. Bibb, Abijah Bigelow, Harmanus Bleecker, Adam Boyd, Elijah Brigham, Robert Brown, Martin Chittenden, Thomas B. Cooke, Lewis Condit, Roger Davis, Samuel Dinsmoor, William Ely, James Emott, William Findley, James Fisk, Asa Fitch, Thomas R. Gold, Isaiah L. Green, Bolling Hall, Obed Hall, John A. Harper, John M. Hyneman, Philip B. Key, Robert Le Roy Livingston, Aaron Lyle, George C. Maxwell, Arunah Metcalf, James Milnor, Samuel L. Mitchill, Benjamin Pond, Peter B. Porter, Josiah Quincy, William Reed,

Henry M. Ridgely, William Rodman, Thomas Sam

mons, Ebenezer Seaver, Adam Seybert, Samuel Shaw, John Smilie, George Smith, Silas Stow, William Strong, George Sullivan, Samuel Taggart, Peleg Tallman, Uri Tracy, Charles Turner, jun., Pierre Van Cortlandt, jun., Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, and William Widgery. - NAYs—Willis Alston, jun., Stevenson Archer, John Baker, David Bard, Burwell Bassett, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, James Breckenridge, William A. Burwell, William Butler, John C. Calhoun, Epaphroditus Champion, Langdon Cheves, John Clopton, William Crawford, John Davenport, jun., John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, Felix Grundy, Aylett Hawes, Jacob Hufty, John P. Hungerford, Richard Jackson, jun., Richard M. Johnson, Joseph Kent, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Lyman Law, Joseph Lefever, Joseph Lewis, jun., Peter Little, William Lowndes, Nathaniel Macon, Thomas Moore, Archibald McBryde, William McCoy, Samuel McKee, Alexander McKim, James Morgan, Jeremiah Morrow, Jonathan O. Moseley, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Joseph Pearson, Israel Pickens, William Piper, Timothy Pitkin, jun., James Pleasants, jun., Elisha R. Potter, John Randolph, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Ebenezer Sage, John Sevier, John Smith,

Richard Stanford, Lewis B. Sturges, Benjamin Tallmadge, Robert Whitehill, David R. Williams, Thomas

'Wilson, and Richard Winn.

The question was then taken on the passage of the bill, and resolved in the affirmative.

MILITARY corporal, PUNISHMENT. Mr. RANDolph prefaced a motion on this sub

ject by observing that he trusted it was, one on

which there would be no difference of opinion.

The subject had before now been agitated in the

House, and had been spoken of at least, if not formally brought before the Committee of For

eign Relations; but deeming it more specifically

to belong to the committee on that part of the President's Message relating to our military affairs, he wished to give it that direction. If they were, according to the wishes of the Executive, to increase the standing military force, to authorize the President to accept the services of volunteer companies, and to call out detachments of militia; in other words, if there was the slightest probability that the public force of the country would be brought into action; the first step to be taken must be to amend the rules and articles of war, so as to abolish the use of the lash. Although the vagrants picked up in alehouses and tippling shops might submit to this degradation, it was well known, Mr. R. said, that the yeomanry of the country would not; and he would venture to say that, formidable as they would be to an enemy in the field, they would prove more so to their officers if this sort of military discipline Were attempted to be introduced among them. He remarked also that, notwithstanding all that could be said by military coxcombs, by the, sticklers for the old system, experience had proved that flogging was not essential to the strictest military discipline. He, therefore, moved, “That the committee to whom has been referred so much of the President's Message as relates to filling the ranks and prolonging the enlistments of the regular troops, and to an auxiliary force, be instructed to inquire whether any, and what alteration is necessary in the act, entitled ‘An act for establishing rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United

States.”

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

mules, &c., to Santa Cruz, which, according to custom, had been immediately there sold for West India produce, payable in March following, when the importation of the same into the United States was interdicted; and praying that they may be permitted to import the same, the nonimportation law to the contrary notwithstanding. —Referred to the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures. . The bill from the Senate authorizing the surveying and marking certain raads in the State of Ohio, as contemplated by the Treaty of Brownstown, was twice read and committed. The bill person disabled by a wound whilst engaged in conveying the mail of the United States) went through a Committee of the Whole, and was ordered by the House to be engrossed for a third reading. The bill for the relief of Anthony Crease went through a Committee of the Whole, and was, after some objections, reported to the House, who refused to pass it to a third reading, 51 to 48. [The bill went to enable said Crease, an alien, or. * heirs, to hold real estate within this District. --- Mr. Nelson, presented the petition of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the town of Alexandria, praying for an act of incorporation.

[A bill for carrying into effect the prayer of a .

similar petition, it will be recollected, was at the last session rejected by the President of the United States.] The memorial, which is very long, was read" and referred to the Committee of the District of Columbia. Mr. Rhea offered the following resolution, giving as a reason for it; the doubts which seem to hang over the subject: Resolved, That the Committee on Indian Affairs be instructed to inquire, whether the laws of the United States, or the laws of the respective States and Territories, do extend over parts of States and Territories, situated respectively adjacent to the United States, and to which the Indian title is not extinct, and in what manner, and to what extent, and report their opinion thereon. - On the suggestion of Mr. LAcock who remarked on the number of resolutions of this kind

[blocks in formation]

r the relief of Josiah H. Webb (a

This resolution, on the suggestion of Mr. RhEA, who had previously offered a resolution on the same subject, was ordered to lie on the table.

- IMPRESSED SEAMEN.

Mr. Little offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the President of the United States be requested to cause to be laid before this House, as far as practicable, a list of the whole number of persons impressed, seized, and otherwise unlawfully taken from on board vessels sailing under the United States' flag on the high seas or rivers, in ports and harbors; by whom, and under the authority of what Power, Kio. or State, such impressments, seizures, and other unlawful detentions were made; what number thereof are citizens of the United States; with such other information on this subject as he in his judgment may think proper to communicate.

Mr. SEYBERT inquired what period of time the mover, contemplated to be embraced by his resolution.

Mr. Little said his object was to procure every information attainable on a subject which had excited much attention and feeling among the people of the United States, and occasioned loud complaint. He said he had examined the records of the House and found no report on the subject, later than 1807, which report was but partial. His object was to obtain information on the subject from 1792, when the evil was first felt, to the present time.

The resolution lies on the table.

AMERICAN MANUFACTUREs.

Mr. Newton observed that the persons who took the third census had been also directed by law to take accounts of the manufactures of the United States in their respective districts, and make their returns to the office of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. So soon as the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures should be in possession of that report, it was the intention of the committee to take the subject of manufactures into consideration, And he now rose to give notice that the committee were ready to receive any information on this subject which gentleman from any part of the Union might have to communicate. Mr. Rhea, after expressing his thanks for the liberty offered to him to give to the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures any information he might possess on the subject of the manufactures of the country in which he lived; but thinking its possible he might not have the honor of coming before that committee, he should move the consideration of the resolution offered by him some days ago for laying additional duties on the coarse manufactures of certain materiais imported into the United States. It appeared from the gentleman's statement, that the committee had now before them no specific proposition for encouraging manufactures, and were waiting for a certain something from the Treasury Department, which they did not know, when they should receive. He, therefore, hoped they would take up his resolution. *

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PROCESS IN FEDERAL COURTS.

The House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the bill providing for the more convenient taking of affidavits ... used in civil cases in the courts of the United States, and to provide the mode of taking bail in certain cases.

The bill goes to authorize certain judicial officers in each State, such as the Chancellor and Judges of the Superior Courts, &c., to receive bail and take affidavits to be used in civil cases in the courts of the United States.]

Considerable conversation took place between Messrs. Gold, Gholson, McCoy, KING, Fisk. Cheves, MILNor, CLAY, (Speaker,) Key; and Ely, on the principle as well as on the details of the bill. - -

It appeared, from what was said by different gentlemen, that there was no uniform rule prescribed in such cases by the laws of the United States; that whilst in New York and Pennsylvania, clients frequently had to travel three or four hundred miles to the district Judge, or to the office of the clerk of the court, to make affidavit or to enter bail; yet in Kentucky, Maryland, and Massachusetts, affidavits were made or bail entered before any authority commissioned to do the same as to the State courts. The bill was objected to, therefore, principally on two grounds; because it abridged the rights of the people of those States where the greatest latitude of indulgence already existed, and because the courts of the United States were authorized to make such rules and regulations in this case as they should think proper. There appearing, however, to be much difference of opinion on the subject among the legal characters of the House, the committee rose, and the bill was recommitted to the committee who reported it, to which on motion of Mr. Gold, four other members were added, viz: Mr. Cheves, Mr. Key, Mr. Ely, and Mr. Gholson.

Wennesday, November 27.

Mr. Gholson made an unfavorable report on the claims of several petitioners barred by the statutes of limitation.—Referred to a Committee of the Whole. The engrossed bill for the relief of Josiah H. Webb, was read a third time, and passed. Mr. MoRRow reported favorably on the petition of sundry land claimants in Mississippi Territory, raying for an extension of time for paying the ast instalment on purchases of public lands.—Recommitted to the Land Committee, to report a bill thereon. The House went into a Committee of the Whole, on the report of the Committee of Elections, on the contested election of John P. Hun. gerford. Before any decision could be had, the Committee rose, and the House adjourned.

Thursday, November 28. Two other members, to wit: William PAULDing, jun., from New York, and Charles GoldsBorough, from Maryland, appeared, produced their

|credentials, were qualified, and took their seats.

The annual report of the Secretary of the

Treasury, respecting the regulation of the cur

rency of foreign coins, was laid before the House. by the SPEAKER, and ordered to lie on the table. Mr. Morrow presented the petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of New Orleans, praying that Congress will invest the right to a certain lot of land lying in the city of New Orleans, in the corporation thereof, on which it is proposed, under an act of the said corporation, to erect steam engines, and the ". buildings by which it is contemplated to supply the said city with water. * Mr. Bacon, moved the following resolutions, which were agreed to : 'Resolved, That the Committee of Ways and Means be instructed to inquire into the expediency of continuing in force, for a further time, an act, entitled “An act, continuing, for a limited time, the salaries of the officers of Government therein mentioned,” and have leave to report by bill or otherwise. Resolved, That the Committee of Ways and Means be instructed to inquire into the expediency of continuing in force for a further time the first section of an act, entitled “An act further to protect the commerce and seamen of the United States against the Barbary Powers,” and that they have leave to report by bill or otherwise. Mr. MoRRow moved the following resolution, predicating it on the late unfortunate occurrence on the Wabash: , , - * * Resolved, That the President of the United States be authorized to loan to the State of Ohio — stand of arms, with bayonets and cartouch boxes, and pieces of field artillery, on 'the Legislature of that State making such provision by law as shall, in his opinion, afford security for their safe-keeping and return, save the damage and loss incident to use and accident in actual service.

[blocks in formation]

Mr. JENNINGs moved the following resolution, which was agreed to: Resolved, That a committee be instructed to inquire into the expediency of allowing the qualified voters in the several counties in the Indiana Territory to elect their sheriffs in their respective counties, and that the said committee inquire likewise into the expediency of allowing appeals in certain cases, from the Territorial courts to the courts of the United States, and what amendments, if any, are necessary to be made to an act entitled “an act to divide the Indiana Territory into two separate governments,” with leave to report by bill, bills, or otherwise.

Messrs. Jennings, Sevień, New, Roberts, Wilson, Morgan, and Maxwell, were appointed the committee.

WESTERN RoADs. Mr. MoRRow made a report of the committee appointed on the 11th instant, “to inquire into the expediency of laying out and making the roads contemplated by the Treaty of Brownstown,”

« FöregåendeFortsätt »