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THE

WESLEYAN-METHODIST

MAGAZINE,

FOR

1847 :

BEING A CONTINUATION OF THE

ARMINIAN OR METHODIST MAGAZINE;

FIRST PUBLISHED BY THE

REV. JOHN WESLEY, A.M.

FOURTH SERIES.

VOL. III.-PART I.

VOLUME LXX. FROM THE COMMENCEMENT.

LONDON:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN MASON,
WESLEYAN CONFERENCE OFFICE, 14, CITY-ROAD;

AND SOLD AT 66, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

LOSION: PRINTED BY JAMES NICHOLS, HOXTON-SQUARE.

PRE FACE.

The Annual Preface, which it is the duty of the Editors of the Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine to prepare for their readers, on the completion of the last Number for the current year, differs, in several respects, from other compositions whose general character may nevertheless be the same. Usually, these are prefixed to works devoted to some one subject, the plan and object of which may, therefore, for the most part, be easily stated. A Magazine is miscellaneous, and the Wesleyan Magazine is very extensively so. Of such a work, any thing like a clear resumé, if not absolutely impossible, would yet require room far beyond that within the limits of which our Preface must be confined. Still, there are some topics connected with the subjects which have, during the last year, occupied our successive Numbers, as well as with the designs with which they have been presented to the subscribers, on which a few observations may be properly expected. Thanks to our subscribers for their kind encouragement, and to our correspondents for their very valuable assistance, we hope never to omit: in the midst of labours which they know must be arduous and unremitting, often have we been thus greatly cheered, and never more so than during the year 1847. When diversity of taste among such a number of readers is remembered, and the necessity of meeting it to the utmost extent compatible with the character of the volume, it would not be surprising, nor even discouraging, if occasionally the language of complaint were heard. But of this we know scarcely anything. Suggestions, for what some persons may consider as improvements, we place not in this category. It is not often we receive even these ; but when we do, we give them that respectful attention which the obligations of our position impose, and which is still more their due because of the kindliness of the manner in which they are presented. In repeating our grateful acknowledgments both to subscribers and correspondents, as well as requesting "the continuance of their favours,” (this formal language very inadequately expresses our sincere feelings on the subject; but, consistently with brevity, we can employ no better,) we likewise repeat the assurances which we have often given before, that we will spare no pains in at least ENDEAVOURING, so long as this important superintendence is committed to us, to make each Number issuing from the press such as that the completed volume shall be as nearly as possible what it is expected to be. At the same time, we are encouraged by the past to add, that we know how much our labours need the kind consideration of our friends, and that we trust it will still be extended to them.

On reviewing the contents of the several Numbers for 1847, we are thankful to perceive that so large a portion possesses that spiritual character, to the anticipation of which the very title of the volume directly leads. Other subjects we are, of course, expected to intro

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