I Heard It Through the Grapevine: Rumor in African-American Culture

Framsida
University of California Press, 28 sep. 1993 - 260 sidor
This book divides into two basic parts. In Chapters 1 and 2 I discuss historical examples of "rumor" discourse and suggest whey many blacks have--for good reason--channeled beliefs about race relations into familiar formulae, ones developed as early as the time of the first contact between sub-Saharan Africans and European white. Then in Chapters 3-7 it explores the continuation of these issues in late-twentieth-century African-American rumors and contemporary legends, using examples collected in the field. Because Turner was able to monitor these contemporary legends as they unfolded and played themselves out, rigorous analysis was possible. What follows, then, is an examination of the themes common to these contemporary items and related historical ones, and an explanation for their persistence. Concerns about conspiracy, contamination, cannibalism, and castration--perceived threats to individual black bodies, which are then translated into animosity toward the race as a whole--run through nearly four hundred years of black contemporary legend material and prove remarkable tenacious. 

Från bokens innehåll

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Innehåll

Introduction
1
Cannibalism 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒅𝒐𝒆 𝒆𝒂𝒕 𝒆𝒂𝒄𝒉 𝒐𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝒂𝒍𝒊𝒗𝒆
9
Corporal Control 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒕 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆𝒂𝒕 𝒖𝒔 𝒃𝒖𝒓𝒏 𝒖𝒔 𝒘𝒉𝒂𝒕𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒓 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒄𝒂𝒏 𝒅𝒐
33
Conspiracy I 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝑲𝑲𝑲 𝒅𝒊𝒅 𝒊𝒕
57
Conspiracy II 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒑𝒐𝒘𝒆𝒓𝒔 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒃𝒆 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒕 𝒕𝒐 𝒌𝒆𝒆𝒑 𝒖𝒔 𝒅𝒐𝒘𝒏
108
Contamination 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒕 𝒕𝒐 𝒅𝒐 𝒎𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒏 𝒋𝒖𝒔𝒕 𝒌𝒊𝒍𝒍 𝒖𝒔
137
ConsumerCorporate Conflict 𝑻𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒘𝒐𝒏𝒕 𝒈𝒆𝒕 𝒎𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒖𝒚 𝒊𝒕
165
Crack 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒘𝒂𝒏𝒕 𝒖𝒔 𝒕𝒐 𝒕𝒂𝒌𝒆 𝒂𝒍𝒍 𝒐𝒇 𝒕𝒉𝒐𝒔𝒆 𝒅𝒓𝒖𝒈𝒔
180
Conclusion From Cannibalism to Crack
202
Continuing Concerns
221
Notes
229
Bibliography
245
Index
255
Upphovsrätt

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sida 110 - And no word can be found in the Constitution which gives Congress a greater power over slave property, or which entitles property of that kind to less protection than property of any other description.
Sida 11 - Many merchants and planters now came on board, though it was in the evening. They put us in separate parcels and examined us attentively. They also made us jump, and pointed to the land, signifying we were to go there. We thought by this we should be eaten by these ugly men, as they appeared to us...
Sida 25 - I was afraid to speak to any one for fear of speaking to the wrong one, and thereby falling into the hands of money-loving kidnappers, whose business it was to lie in wait for the panting fugitive, as the ferocious beasts of the forest lie in wait for their prey. The motto which I adopted when I started from slavery was this— "Trust no man!
Sida 37 - After a patient waiting, I got one of our city papers, containing an account of the number of petitions from the north, praying for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, and of the slave trade between the States, From this time I understood the words abolition and abolitionist, and always drew near when that word was spoken, expecting to hear something of importance to myself and fellow-slaves.
Sida 26 - ... among fellow-men, yet feeling as if in the midst of wild beasts, whose greediness to swallow up the trembling and halffamished fugitive is only equalled by that with which the monsters of the deep swallow up the helpless fish upon which they subsist...
Sida 37 - I had never had a white man to treat me as an equal, and the idea of a white lady waiting on me at the table was still worse ! Though the table was loaded with the good things of this life, I could not eat. I thought if I could only be allowed the privilege of eating in the kitchen I should be more than satisfied ! Finding that I could not eat, the old lady, who was a " Thompsonian," made me a cup of "composition," or "number six;" but it was so strong and hot, that I called it "number seven!
Sida 39 - ... remote parts of the town suffered in an especial manner. In some cases the searchers scattered powder and shot among their clothes, and then sent other parties to find them, and bring them forward as proof that they were plotting insurrection.
Sida 67 - ... spirit of unrestrained outlawry constantly increases in violence, and casts its blight over a continually growing area of territory. We plead not for the colored people alone, but for all victims of the terrible injustice which puts men and women to death without form of law. During the year 1894, there were 132 persons executed in the United States by due form of law, while in the same year, 197 persons were put to death by mobs who gave the victims no opportunity to make a lawful defense. No...
Sida 25 - Let him be a fugitive slave in a strange land— a land given up to be the hunting-ground for slaveholders— whose inhabitants are legalized kidnappers— where he is every moment subjected to the terrible liability of being seized upon by his fellowmen, as the hideous crocodile seizes upon his prey!— I say, let him place himself in my situation— without home or friends— without money or credit— wanting shelter, and no one to give it— wanting bread, and no money to buy it,— and at the...
Sida 13 - We are sometimes sufficiently plagued with a parcel of slaves which come from a far inland country who very innocently persuade one another that we buy them only to fatten and afterward eat them as a delicacy.

Om författaren (1993)

Patricia A. Turner is Professor of African-American and African Studies at the University of California at Davis and the author of Ceramic Uncles & Celluloid Mammies: Black Images and Their Influence on Culture (1994).

Bibliografisk information